The Lazy Genius

Security News & Brain Dumps from Xavier Ashe, a Bit9 Client Partner

IT Mangers complain about CIOs

Posted by Xavier Ashe on May 20, 2005

I found this amusing. 
Since I sell security products, I talk with both IT Managers and CIOs every
day.  I also subscribe to CIO Magazine
TechRepublic has a
PDF download
outlining 15
complaints that IT Managers have about CIOs
.

One of the best ways to gauge your management skills as a CIO is to
measure them against common concerns voiced by IT managers about their
bosses. When TechRepublic asked, members unleashed a host of
grievances, from poor communications to a lack of confidence in their
knowledge and decision-making capabilities. We've collected some of the
most prevalent complaints to give you an idea of the types of issues
that are on the minds of IT managers when it comes to their
relationships with CIOs and VPs.

Here's a few from the list:

#5 Is ignorant on tech issues
– He thinks that because he is my boss, he should act like he knows
everything about the services we provide, although he sometimes doesn't.

#9 Doesn’t respect the staff's knowledge
I get peeved when I have an “urgent” request from a user and the boss
keeps changing his mind on whether he wants me to do the project. I
believe I was hired to help evaluate whether a project should be done,
and my comments and opinions are ignored. For example, if I recommend a
project, he turns it down, but then the user goes directly to him, and
the project is done! I lose a lot of credibility that way.

While the two I listed above can indicate a poor leader, I
think they also represent a dividing line between Staff and Executives.  Some
IT professionals, who have climbed up through the ranks, feel like they have
broken into “management” by becoming IT Managers.  They have become
less hands-on, but still retain a one-of-the-guys/gals persona so they can
relate to their staff.  CIOs tend to not have much experience with IT
trench warfare, or have forgotten it all.  The popularity of the CIO has
caused the IT manager's position to be less management, and more team leader,
leaving the cultural divide that has always been there between IT Staff and
Management.

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